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November 07, 2012
Weight loss does not appear to lower diabetes risk

An intensive diet and exercise program resulting in weight loss does not reduce heart attack and stroke in people with longstanding type 2 diabetes. The results come from a study supported by the National Institutes of Health.

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The study tested whether a lifestyle intervention resulting in weight loss would reduce rates of heart disease, stroke, and cardiovascular-related deaths in overweight and obese people with type 2 diabetes, a group at increased risk for these conditions.

Researchers worked with more than 5,000 people. Half underwent a “lifestyle intervention,” and the other half were in a general program of diabetes support and education.

Although the diet and exercise group did not see a reduction in cardiovascular events, they did experience health benefits. Among these were decreased sleep apnea, better physical mobility, and a reduced need for diabetes medications.

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